100 Bike Racer Levels in 10 Categories for 15 Distances
Speed/Power Thresholds at Various Times/Distances
Views PHP Hits Count
17 Cycling Distance Zones
1 Speed 3
250M - 5K 10" - 8'
1 250M 30" Sprint
Level TT
2 1K 1' Attack 4x
Level TT
3 3K 3' Pursuit Strava Pursuit 5K Ride 3x
Level  TT
2K
Strava Pursuit 5K Ride
3K
4K
Strava Pursuit 5K Ride
5K
 
10 Bike Racer Categories 1 Hr
1 International Profesional
Levels 1 - 12 / 30 - 33 MPH
2 Domestic Profesional
Levels 13 - 22 / 27.5 - 30 MPH
3 Category 1
Levels 23 - 27 / 26.25 - 27.5 MPH
4 Category 2
Levels 28 - 32 / 25 - 26.25 MPH
5 Category 3
Levels 33 - 40 / 23 - 25 MPH
6 Category 4
Levels 41 - 48 / 21 - 23 MPH
7 Category 5
Levels 49 - 53 / 19.75 - 21 MPH
8 Fast Commuter
Levels 54 - 65 / 16.75 - 19.75 MPH
9 Average Commuter
Levels 66 - 80 / 13 - 16.75 MPH
10 Slow Commuter
Levels 81 - 100 / 8 - 13 MPH
Pages 5
3 Sample Racers
4 Overall
5 Climbing
3 Strava Pages
1 Boulder 86
2 Road Riding on Flats 178
3 Road Riding in Mountains 241
4 Mountain Biking 327
5 Cyclocross 105
6 Running 166
7 Mountain Summits 142
4 Race Ideas
1 Tour of Boulder
2 High School Tour de France
3 Cross Country Time Trial Track
My Bike Racer levels page popped up suddenly around August of 2013 when I moved to Boulder. When I moved here I looked out of the window and saw the Flatirons and decided that I wanted to get into Mountain Biking and Triathlon Culture, but before I actually participate myself I want to make a web page for it so that it is interesting to me as well as beneficial to society. .

I have created 100 different speed levels over nine time/distance categories, as well as climbing and combined levels with a total of 11

level categories.

The speed categories are displayed by results in real time trials, triathlons and strava rides that correspond to their respective distance categories. The rider is attached to a speed category by what their average speed is in a race of a distance that is within the range of it's level. With this method, you can compare riders from different time trials as if they were in the same time trial. You just need to make sure that the course you are using is flat and fast so everybody in the list is at relatively the same advantage. I list what race they are in and what division they are so the levels of the divisions can be determined with my Category Level Chart. Some other charts I have are a passing speed chart that is a cross chart that shows how fast people of each category pass each other, the pulling and drafting chart, which shows the percentage of drafting and pulling various levels of riders would do when they ride with each other in groups of two, the fade chart which shows the levels of each distance for a particular rider, the rider type chart which shows the weight range of riders showing the advantages and disadvantages of the heavy vs light riders, the weight carry chart which shows how much of the slower person's weight the faster person would have to carry in order to be at the same speed, and the fluid trainer speed chart which shows how fast someone is going in real life on a triathlon bike according to how fast someone is going on a Fluid Trainer.

In order to make the bike riding experience even more interesting, I have created a map to show 100 speed levels of eight distances and Riding Times so that people can guage their progress and decline throughout their life long bike racing carreers. The Bike Racer Levels page doesn't just increase interest in cycling, it also helps people become better cyclists. If you know how good all of the riders are, then it is easier to put appropriate teams together for big rides and races. It also helps people determine how talented they are because it displays how good various types of cyclists are with specific names attached to each level that people can research and find out the talent range because you will read of someone who did very well after a short time training or another person on the other side of the spectrum who trains all the time for years and can only reach a certain level. The levels page is supposed to help the non talented as well as the talented. It helps the talented because it incourages people. It helps the non talented because it shows them how much they need to ride in order to get to a level they want to get to, and to be realistic. When you know how good you are not, it is easier on your ego to be as bad as you are because you know you are not alone.

Different people are talented at different distances and it is interesting to study why and how different people in the pack perform differently between the different distances. Sometimes a person's riding talent is a result of their genetics and sometimes it is a result of their training.

How the Bike Racer Levels Page works

The Bike Racer Levels Pages are to standartize all of the time trials and divisions to create a clear representation where everybody is in the pack. Because people's speeds change throughout the ride, there are 10 Time/Distance Categories, but the base level by which we simply define a racer's level is the One Hour/40Kilometer/25Mile one because it represents a typical ride. The 20 Minute one is almost as important because it represents a typical commute as well as the typical distance of a time trial for juniors and women. When people talk about someone's FTP it seems like about half the time they are talking about the 20 minute one. People are not good at distinguishing which one they are talking about so you have to guess which one it is based on who they are and what is realistic.

Riding Conditions

The level of a persons road riding is divided into eleven Riding Conditions, which include nine Time/Distance and three climbing levels, with the benchmark being the one hour represented by 40 Kilometer Time Trial. I like making the times and distances of the different racing time levels increase in a symetrical way in order to keep it simple, even though riders decrease speed as miles increase which more than doubles time.

Kreuzotter Calculor

I don't know how they did it, but the Germans have created the Kreuzotter page, which scienfically calculates a riders level by entering every important variable within reason pertaining to the bicycle and the rider. With this tool all you need is someone's Flat Time Trial time and the kind of bike they used then you know what rider level they are on the flats. If you know their bodyweight then all you have to do is enter 8.11% to the climb field and you know their L'alpe D'huez climbing speed and then can calculate your time on my Climbing Level page or Climbing Time trial page.

Determining my Bike Racer Levels throughout my Bike Racing Career

I never timed myself or went to any Time Trials as a kid. I was more of an adventure Mountain Biker. I guess I was around mid pack. I raced the Red Zinger Mini Classic stage race around Boulder four times from 1984-87 and then was strictly a Mountain Biker. I was 16th in '84, 8th in '85, 18th in '86 and 25th in '87. Even though I could have done it two more years I quit racing the Red Zinger after I was 13 because I developed a knee disease called Osgood–Schlatter and was told to stop riding hard. I was also told to quit running and Nordic Ski Racing. I was on the 7th grade track team and didn't run again until 12th grade cross country. I don't think it was necesary for my knee to quit Ski racing but I didn't mind it because my brother did it too and I knew how expensive it was for my parents. I went to physical therapy a couple times a week one year when I was like doing ultra sound on the sore lump under my knee. I like to believe that because I took those precautions I will have healthy knees for when I start riding my bike again.

I was a Mountain Bike racer until through the 1991 summer when I was 17. I didn't do any group rides during that time so it's hard to guess what level I was. I did four Licensed Junior races in '90 or '91 I can't remember which, and I think I got last or second to last place in all of them, I think because I didn't have leg speed because they started off really fast and it was over for me immediately. On a good day I was a pretty good mountain biker though so for this chart I will classify myself growing up as the average for a boy of my age. I have a thin build so maybe a little above average on the climbs and a little below average on the flats to keep it simple.

The first time I timed myself on anything was in 2008 when I did the Lyons to Boulder Time Trial, but I wasn't in riding shape. I was only riding about once every couple weeks and I couldn't feel my legs which is a guage on whether or not i'm in "riding shape". My time was 33:09 I think which was dead last for the men and I think I beat like three or women. I think that put me around the top of fast commuter where you would expect me to be having not been regularly training.

The 25 Mile Per Hour speed range consists of 10 categories that increase in speed from 8 to 33 miles per hour in increments of 5, 3.75, 3, 1.25, 2, 2, 1.25, 1.25, 2.5, and 3. Three miles per hour is the maximum difference in speed that riders can have and be riding partners because drafting reduces 30% of watts needed to maintain a certain speed which is how much less watts you would need to reduce your speed by three miles per hour, so if a 27 mph rider is on a ride with a 24 mph.

Plus there's (Wikipedia):

Eddington number for cycling

Eddington is credited with devising a measure of a cyclist's long-distance riding achievements. The Eddington number in the context of cycling is defined as the maximum number E such that the cyclist has cycled E miles on E days.

For example, an Eddington number of 70 miles would imply that the cyclist has cycled at least 70 miles in a day on at least 70 occasions. Achieving a high Eddington number is difficult since moving from, say, 70 to 75 will (probably) require more than five new long distance rides, since any rides shorter than 75 miles will no longer be included in the reckoning. Eddington's own life-time E-number was 84.

The Eddington number for cycling is analogous to the h-index that quantifies both the actual scientific productivity and the apparent scientific impact of a scientist.

The Eddington Number for cycling involves units of both distance and time. The significance of E is tied to its units. For example, in cycling an E of 62 miles means a cyclist has covered 62 miles at least 62 times. The distance 62 miles is equivalent to 100 kilometers. However, an E of 62 miles may not be equivalent to an E of 100 kilometers. A cyclist with an E of 100 kilometers would mean 100 or more rides of at least 100 kilometers were done. While the distances 100 kilometers and 62 miles are equivalent, an E of 100 kilometers would require 38 more rides of that length than an E of 62 miles.

Visitors PHP Hits Count
17 Cycling Distance Zones
3 Endurance4
100 - 6,000 Km 5 Hours - 30 Days
8 180K 6' Grind 2x
Level TT
9 360K 12' March 2x
Level TT
10 720K 24' Slog 2x
Level TT
11 1,500K 2D Rally  2x
Level TT 
4 Ultra Endurance6
100 - 6,000 Km 5 Hours - 30 Days
12 5,000K 1W Push 3.3x
Level TT
13 10,000K 2W Tour 2x
Level TT
14 15,000K 1M Trip 2x
Level TT
15 30,000K 3M Trek 6x
Level TT
16 120,000K 1Y Journey 4x
Level TT
17 500KK 75Y Life 4.16x
Level TT
17 Cycling Distance Zones
200M - 750K Km 10" - 1 Lifetime
1 Sprint 250M 30" 200-500M 10-30" 120 40-10
2 Attack 1K 1' 500M-1.6K 30"-2.5M 00 00-00
3 Pursuit 3K 3' 1.6-5K 2.5-7M 00 00-00
4 Commute 10K 15' 5-15K 7.5-17.5' 00 00-00
5 Spin 20K 30' 15-35K 17.5-45' 00 00-00
6 Effort 40K Hour 35-80 45'-1.5H 00 00-00
7 Burn 90K 3H 80-120K 1.5-3.5 00 00-00
8 Grind 180K 6H 120-300K 3.5H 00 00-00
9 March 400K 12H 300-550K H 00 00-00
10 Slog 800K 24H 550-1KK 18-36H 00 00-00
11 Rally 1,500K 2D 1-2KK H 00 00-00
12 Push 5K Km Week 2-7.5KK D 00 00-00
13 Tour 10K Km 2W 7.5-12.5KK  D 00 00-00
14 Trip 15K Km Month 12.5-22.5KK D 00 00-00
15 Trek 30K Km 3M 22.5-75KK 00 00-00
16 Journey 120K Km Year 75-265KK 00 00-00
17 Lifetime 500K Mi 75Y 265-750KK 00 00-00
Assisted
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Kickin' it with Bernie
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In the 80's I was Junior Member of the
Red Zinger Bike Team
  100 Bike Racer Levels  
1 International Pro 12 30 - 33 3
1/1 32.75 - 33
2/2 32.5 - 32.75
3/3 32.25 - 32.5
4/4 32 - 32.25
5/5 31.75 - 32
6/6 31.5 - 31.75
7/7 31.25 - 31.5
8/8 31 - 31.25
9/9 30.75 - 31
10/10 30.5 - 30.75
11/11 30.25 - 30.5
12/12 30 - 30.25
2 Domestic Pro 10 27.5 - 30 2.5
13/1 29.75 - 30
14/2 29.5 - 29.75
15/3 29.25 - 29.5
16/4 29 - 29.25
17/5 28.75 - 29
18/6 28.5 - 28.75
19/7 28.25 - 28.5
20/8 28 - 28.25
2 Domestic Pro 10 27.5 - 30 2.5
21/9 27.75 - 28
22/10 27.5 - 27.75
3 Cat 1 5 26.25 - 27.5 1.25
23/1 27.25 - 27.5
24/2 27 - 27.25
25/3 26.75 - 27
26/4 26.5 - 26.75
27/5 26.25 - 26.5
4 Cat 2 5 25 - 26.25 1.25
28/1 26 - 26.25
29/2 25.75 - 26
30/3 25.5 - 25.75
31/4 25.25 - 25.5
32/5 25 - 25.25
5 Cat 3 8 23 - 25 2
33/1 24.75 - 25
34/2 24.5 - 24.75
35/3 24.25 - 24.5
36/4 24 - 24.25
37/5 23.75 - 24
38/6 23.5 - 23.75
39/7 23.25 - 23.5
40/8 23 - 23.25
6 Cat 4 8 21 - 23 2
41/1 22.75 - 23
42/2 22.5 - 22.75
43/3 22.25 - 22.5
44/4 22 - 22.25
45/5 21.75 - 22
46/6 21.5 - 21.75
47/7 21.25 - 21.5
48/8 21 - 21.25
7 Cat 5 5 19.75 - 21 1.25
49/1 20.75 - 21
50/2 20.5 - 20.75
51/3 20.25 - 20.5
52/4 20 - 20.5
53/5 19.75 - 20
8 Fast Commuter 14
18 - 19.75 1.75
54/1 19.5 - 19.75
55/2 19.25 - 19.5
56/3 19 - 19.25
57/4 18.75 - 19
58/5 18.5 - 18.75
59/6 18.25 - 18.5
60/7 18 - 18.25
8 Fast Commuter 14 18 - 19.75 1.75
54/8 19.5 - 19.75
55/9 19.25 - 19.5
56/10 19 - 19.25
57/11 18.75 - 19
58/12 18.5 - 18.75
59/13 18.25 - 18.5
60/14 18 - 18.25
9 Averave Commuter 5
16.75 - 18 1.25
61/1 17.75 - 18
62/2 17.5 - 17.75
63/3 17.25 - 17.5
64/4 17 - 17.25
65/5 16.75 - 17
10 Slow Commuter 35
8 - 16.75 8.75
66/1 16.5 - 16.75
67/2 16.25 - 16.5
68/3 16 - 16.25
69/4 15.75 - 16
70/5 15.5 - 15.75
71/6 15.25 - 15.5
72/7 15 - 15.25
73/8 14.75 - 15
74/9 14.5 - 14.74
75/10 14.25 - 14.5
76/11 14 - 14.25
77/12 13.75 - 14
78/13 13.5 - 13.75
79/14 13.25 - 13.5
80/15 13 - 13.25
10 Slow Commuter 35
8 - 16.75 8.75
81/16 12.75 - 13
82/17 12.5 - 12.75
83/18 12.25 - 12.5
84/19 12 - 12.25
85/20 11.75 - 12
86/21 11.5 - 11.75
87/22 11.25 - 11.5
88/23 11 - 11.25
89/24 10.75 - 11
90/25 10.5 - 10.75
91/26 10.25 - 10.5
92/27 10 - 10.25
93/28 9.75 - 10
94/29 9.5 - 9.75
95/30 9.25 - 9.5
96/31 9 - 9.25
97/32 8.75 - 9
98/33 8.5 - 8.75
99/34 8.25 - 8.5
100/35 8 - 8.25
10 Cyclists Categories
1 Hour / 40K
1 I Pro 30 - 33 45:35 - 49:35
2 D Pro 29 - 30 49:35 - 51:35
3 C1 28 - 29 51:35 - 53:15
4 C2 27 - 28 53:15 - 55:10
5 C3 25 - 27 55:10 - 59:40
6 C4 22.5 - 25 59:40 - 1:06:15
7 C5 20 - 22.5 1:06:15 - 1:14:30
8 FC 17.5 - 20 1:14:30 - 1:25
9 AC 15 - 17.5 1:25 - 1:41
10 SC 10 - 15 1:41 -3:48


g

1 Rider Division Chart
Age & Sex
Male Racer Category
Local

National

International
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 Slow Commuter 5
8
10.5
13
2 11 - 12 4
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 11 - 12
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 11 - 12
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 Average Commuter 3.75
13
14.9
16.75
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 Fast Commuter 3
16.75
18.25
19.75
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 Category 5 1.25
19.75
20.4
21
5 17 - 18 4
23
20
25
22
27
24
5 17 - 18 4
25
22
27
24
29
26
5 17 - 18 3
27
24
28.5
25.5
30
27
5 Category 4 2
21
22
23
6 Pro 3
26.25
24
28.5
25.5
27.5
25
6 Pro
27.5
24
28.75
25.5
30
28
6 Pro
30
25
31.5
27
33
29
6 Category 3 2
23
24
25
7 35 - 39
7 35 - 39
7 35 - 39
7 Category 2 1.25
25
25.6
26.25
8 40 - 44
28
8 40 - 44
8 40 - 44
8 Category 1 1.25
26.25
26.9
27.5
9 45 - 49
27
9 45 - 49
9 45 - 49
9 Domestic Professional Racer 2.5
27.5
24
28.75
25.5
30
27
10 50 - 54
10 50 - 54
10 50 - 54
10 International Professional Racer 3
30
25
31.5
27
33
29
11 55 - 59
11 55 - 59
11 55 - 59
12 60 - 64
12 60 - 64
12 60 - 64
13 65 - 69
13 65 - 69
13 65 - 69
14 70 - 74
14 70 - 74
14 70 - 74
15 75 - 79
15 75 - 79
15 75 - 79
16 80 - 84
12
16 80 - 84
13
16 80 - 84
14
 


The 12 Time/Distance categories are:

1 Sprinting for 5 seconds, Power 9 - 30 Seconds

2 Aenarobic Power which takes one minute for the average rider to go a Kilometer, 30 Seconds - 2 Minutes

3 Functional Aenarobic Power for five minutes in track races of three to four Kilometers 5-6 Minutes, 3-4 Kilometers

4 Aerobic for 20 Minutes represented by races that are 8 to 20 Kilometers on my list. 20 - 30 Minutes, 18-30 Kilometers

5 Functional Aerobic Threshold Power; otherwise known as FTP. 1H/40K (45 Minutes - 2 Hours, 35-60 Kilometers)
24.85M/40K

6 Glyco-Lipolitic Distance which are 90K Half Marathon Bike Splits and take around three hours. It's called Glyco because after an hour and a half the glycogen (sugar) leaves your muscles and you have to slow down and have to wait for more glycogen from your stomach. 90K/2.5 Hrs 2 - 3 Hours

7 Endurance represented by 180 Kilometer Ironman Races that usually take six hours. 8) Ultra Endurance which is represented as double Endurance in time and distance, and then 9) Adventure which is doubles the distance and time again up to 24 hours and 720 Kilometers, which is 447 Miles. 180K/4 -6 Hours

8 Ultra Endurance
8-12 Hours
360

Climbing Level

While fast flat non drafting time trials are the only way to standardize rider levels, they don't represent the real world because of the hills and mountains, so I made a standardized climbing level as a way to illustrate how peoples place on the levels changes between flats and climbs based on bodyweight. The course that I fixed the climbing level to is the one with the most extensive results, L'alpe D'huez of Tour de France fame. L'alpe D'huez is also perfect as a standardized climbing course because it matches perfectly with the Hour FTP because it takes the average racer about an hour to ride up. People in Boulder are fortunate to have a twin sister course to the L'alpe D'huez in the Sunshine Canyon Hillclimb race. From comparing the times of the racers and considering their rider levels I have determined that the L'alpe D'huez climb from the first switchback to the Tour de France finish line takes the exact same time to complete as the Sunshine Canyon race course. The profiles of the two courses are very similar as you can see in the chart to the right. To compare the times on the two courses look at the Climbing page. For people who don't live near L'alpe D'huez or Boulder, climbing speed up the L'alpe D'huez can be calculated by entering the L'alpe D'huez grade (8.11%) and bodyweight to the riders Kreuzotter Calculator Hour speed.

Combination Levels

There are two ways I combine climbing and flat terrain. One is the combined time between the 40 Kilometer Time Trial (or adjusted time in a similar distance TT) and your L'alpe D'huez time, and the other is the time of your 2013 L'alpe D'huez Tour de France stage by plugging your hour ftp speed into the flat sections and your climbing speed into the climbing sections. If you wanted to make it more sophisticated you could plug in your endurance speed into the L'alpe D'huez stage and your hour speed into the climbing & Hour combination stage. In the real world because we don't know people's comparative endurance, the two combination Levels are just two ways to illustrate someone's overall riding, with the first being 50% flats and 50% climbing and the second being more realistic ?% flats and ?% climbing.

12 Race Distances
2 Aenarobic Speed 500 - 1K 1 - 5M
3 Functional Aenarobic 3 - 4 5 - 20M
4 Aerobic 20 20 - 45M
5 Functional Aerobic 40 45 - 60M
6 Glyco-Lipolitic 90 2 - 4H
7 Endurance 180 4 - 7H
8 Ultra Endurance 360 7 - 12H
9 Adventure 720 12 - 24 H / .5 - 1D
10 Trip1,440 1 - 2D
11 Tour 2,880 2 - 7D
12 Expedition 5,760 7 - 30D

 

 

 

It is entertaining and educational to look at visual representations of the various riding speeds with the help of Google Earth. By illustrating where all the different types of riders would be in relation to each other and the landscape, you can visualize where you would be within the greater pack at your current, past and projected racer levels.

These levels are determined by Time Trial and Triathlon Bike Split results on flat courses of all of the Bike Racer Categories in all of the different levels and distances in all three competition levels: 1 Local, 2 National and 3 International. You can read all about my Bike Racer Levels on my Bike Racer Levels page. With Google Earth I have created three visual aids to help illustrate what my 100 bike racer levels are: 1 Radiating Circles, 2 Haystack Time Trial, and 3 the Pack of 200.

1 Radiating Circles & Racers - I have Circles and Racers that represent my 100 Bike Racer Levels by radiating out from Haystack Mountain to distance determined by how far Racers can go in one hour.

I made the Radiating Circles & Racers collection so I could use Google Earth to aid in my study of the area where I live along with where I am within the greater pack of all the racers. I can trace my progress as I gain more ground and pass other riders. I can imagine myself making it farther in one hour in variety of interesting circumstances, such as an imaginary bike race with various riders along multi lane time trial race course who start at the same time and this section would be like taking snapshot of where they would be after their hour time trial, or an imaginary volcano at haystack mountain that spews toxic vapor that radiates out and affects people to various degrees depenting on how far away they made it due to their escape velocities. Because at the time Haystack Mountain was Temple / Building residence like the pyramid hotel in las vegas only the citizens of Santamonium didn't know that it was dormant volcano. They just thought the toxic vapor that came out and made them high was going to be like that forever. But then it just got too much one day and they all had to break out and so the strongest riders had the best chance of survival. The Radiating Circles is visually interesting because the area of the circle that is created by the radius of the rider is of comparable size to historical tribal and kingdom areas. For example, the typical 40 Kilometer diameter tribal territory circumference aligns very closely with the strongest rider of the slow commuter category, and the fastest racer's circle is third of the way between the 80 and 160 Kilometer Diameter Circles, which is around the size of the Roman Republic. When you superimpose everything together with Google Earth you can visualize the relationship between it all in your head in an intricate way that can improve your interest in riding, geography, history, your imagination and all kinds of things. For example, you could be at the middle of level 43 which is the beginning of farmer's field, and you know of someone who is two levels ahead of you at the end of the farmer's field half mile away, so you could imagine your quest to make it accross the farmer's field by improving your 40 kilometer time trial by minute and half which translates into half mile of distance over an hour.

The Radiating Circles on Google Earth illuminates the reality of the bike racer levels in six ways: 1 Racer Categories, 2 Racer Levels, 3 Racer Pins 4 Racer Bodies, 5 Racer Drafter Categories and 6 Racer Puller Categories.

          1 Racer Category Overlays - The 10 Racer Categories have 20% opacity color coded overlays to give land territory to the various bike racer categories. The Racer Category territories range in thickness from 1.25 miles as with the five level categories one and two to the 20 category five mile wide slow commuter territory. These circles make nice looking rainbow from map of the USA.

          2 Racer Level Lines - There are 100 color coded circles that represent how far the fastest rider in each category can ride in one hour. The lines are separated by quarter of mile, which is the distance around the common high school track. This makes it easier to visualize how far away they are when they are consistent with such common feature of the natural landscape as the quarter mile track. It is also consistent with the common farmer's circle which is half mile in diameter, so if you want to catch someone who is one level faster than you it means that you need to make it halfway accross the farmer's field on your favourite local 40 Km or 25 mile time trial course, or to be more accurate, how far you can go in one hour, and take your average speed to determine your level and where you are on the map. When you have location on the map than you can attach physical location to your bike racer level, and you are part of community of time trialists frozen in time as you race through the landscape. You can visualize certain faster people at specific locations to the East and slower people at their places to the West, and view the pathway as metric of how good of bike racer you are.

          3 Racer Pins - an imaginary racetrack that starts at the top of Haystack Mountain and heads West. Maybe one day we will actually have multi lane bike race track that goes from Haystack all the way to the Atlantic Ocean so people can race the ultra long distances in the most luxurious way possible. The pins are put to good use in helping to locate where the line of racing and racers are. You can also use the pins to identify what level you are looking at by clicking on the pin and it shows on the list to the left of Google Earth which level it is.

          4 Racer Bodies & Bikes - 2,089 individual racers are shown in their accurate size as they appear headed east along the imaginary racetrack. There are twelve racers to level, and every level is quarter mile, so the racers are separated by 33.33 meters, which is almost identical to the 33.36 meters between the posts of the walls of historic city. It is also very similar to how far apart racers are in non drafting triathlons, so it looks just like real race.

          5 Racer Drafter's Lines - There are color coded lines next to the riders that show what category of drafter riders behind you are. By knowing the category drafter you know how much percentage they will draft and how slow of riders you can ride with at your 100% one hour riding pace without getting dropped by you.

          6 Racer Pullers Lines - There are color coded lines next to the riders that show which levels of riders faster than you have in relation to you in terms of how much percentage of the time they will pull you and how fast of rider you can ride with where they are going hour pace and you won't get dropped by them.

2 Haystack Time Trial - 0

1 Bikes -

2 Levels -

3 Level Ranges -

4 Riders -

3 Pack of 200 -

5 Area Circles

I have 23 different circle sizes based on diameter ranging from one meter (one person) to 10,340 kilometers (The world). They are designed to familiarize us with the geography of their respective areas, so we can relate the large and the small as well as places of similar size in different locations. For example, if you have the blue circle of the typical 40 kilometer accross tribal area over Boulder County, then it is easier to relate how far apart things are in Rome if you have the same sized circle there because you know how boulder looks at the same dimension. The circles radiate from 43 locations on the globe which represent all of the different landscapes and together with their largest circles cover the entire planet. Within each circle there are color coded tracings of example trips that represent all of the racing distances on self powered vehicles on all terrains. For example, on the 500 Meter circle in the middle of the ocean, there is 50 meter long blue line that represents the 50 meter swimming race, on the 500 Meter circle in Boulder there is 100 Meter red line on the sidewalk that represents 100 meter running race and on the One Kilometer circle there is 500 Meter white line on the road that represents track bike sprint of that distance.

Sizes of Things

If you want to know how big things are and how big they are compared to each other, you came to the right place. My Sizes of things page has 45 size dimensions ranging from the electron to the known universe, with us remarkably close to the middle. The sizes are shown on the top of each size dimension section with the width of the white backWe live in size dimension number 19 so we are 58% closer in size to the Electron than the Universe to be exact. Out of the 45

With us as the anchor dimension at one meter accross the yellow background field, there are 18 smaller dimensions and 29 larger dimensions.

Fade %
1M
28
5M
99%
20M
98%
1Hr
97%
3Hr
95%
6Hr
80%
12Hr
60%
24Hr
50%
Level Speeds for the Various Distances
Category
1 I Pro
2 D Pro
3 C1
4 C2
5 C3
6 C4
7 C5
8 FC
9 AC
10 SC
1 F200M
35.75-40
35.75-34.75
34.75-33.75
33.75-33
33-31.75
31.75-30.75
30.75-29.5
29.5-28.25
28.25-22
N/A-N/A
37.5-32.5
32.5-31.5
31.5-31.5
31.5-29.75
29.75-28.5
28.5-26.5
26.5-25
25-23.75
23.75-22
N/A-N/A
35.25-29
29-28
28-27
27-25.5
25.5-24.5
24.5-23.25
23.25-21.5
21.5-19.75
19.75-15
15-11.25
33-28.5
28.5-27.5
27.5-26.5
26.5-24.5
24.5-24
24-21
21-19.75
19.75-16.75
16.75-15
15-11.25
28.5-27.5
27.5-26.5
26.5-24.5
24.5-24
24-21
21-19.75
19.75-16.75
16.75 -15
15-11.25
11.25-
27.5-28
25.75-27.5
24.5-25.75
23-24.5
21.5-19.75
19.75-17
8 360K
9 720K
10 1,440
11 2,880
12 5,760
Me at what
Age
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
College
T Eur 97
T Aus 99
TSAm 01
TE10 & Mo
1 9-30S
250M
2 30S-2M
500M-1K
3 5-6M
2-4K
4 20-30M
18-30K
5 45M-2H
35-60K
6 2-3H
90K
7 4-6
180K
8 8-12H
360K
9 16-24
720K
10 24H-1W
1,440K
Rider Levels
NCAR Climb Red Zinger '88 & '89

Rider

Time
1 Greg Miller 15
5:23
2 jimi killen 14
5:25
3 Adam Wright 14
5:29

4 Justin Wentworth 14-15

5:35
5 William funk 14-15
5:48
6 Heath Sandall 13
5:52
7 Paul south 14-15
6:00
8 Tony Roberts 14-15
6:02
9 Wyndham Pounds 13
6:08
10 Wyndham Pounds 12
6:17
11 justin biggs 6:20 13
6:20
12 Mike Mcreedy 13
6:20
13 Heath Sandall 12
6:20
14 JP DeAboim 13
6:22
Age Performance Comparison
 
5 mile 4P TTT at Red Zinger Mini Classic
- boys 14-15
12:35
- Boys 13
13:17
- Boys 12
13:52
- girls 12-15's
14:22
- boys 10-11
14:49
 
Cycling Strength to Weight Ratio 8/54
1 International Pro 1 - 9
1 6.60 - 6.69 Doped TDF Winner
2 6.50 - 6.59 FOP Doped Int Pro
3 6.40 - 6.49 Doping
4 6.31 - 6.39 Top Clean Int Pro
5 6.22 - 6.30 FOP Clean Int Pro Little
6 6.13 - 6.21 FOP Clean Int Pro Big
7 6.04 - 6.12 MOP Int Pro Little
8 5.96 - 6.03 MOP Int Pro Big
9 5.87 - 5.95 TOP D Pro
2 Domestic Pro 10 - 15
10 5.78 - 5.86 BOP Int Pro Small
11 5.69 - 5.77 BOP Int Pro Big FOP International Pro
12 5.60 - 5.68 Top Int Pro Tri Theor Max
13 5.51 - 5.59 MOP D Pro Top Int Pro
14 5.42 - 5.50 Top Junior
15 5.33 - 5.41 BOPDPro, Top Elite Triathlete MOP Int Pro
3 Cat 1/Local/Semi Pro 16 - 22
16 5.24 - 5.32 FOPC1, Top Rower
17 5.15 - 5.23 FOP Domestic Pro Triathlete BOP Int Pro
18 5.07 - 5.14 TOP D Pro
19 4.98 - 5.06 MOP D Pro/Tri FOP D Pro
20 4.89 - 4.97 MOPC1 FP D Pro
21 4.80 - 4.88 BOP D Pro Tri FOPC2 TOP Int Pro Tri
22 4.71 - 4.79 BOPC1 MOP D Pro
4 Cat 2 - Gifted 9-5er 23 - 27
23 4.62 - 4.70 TOPAgerTri TOPC1
24 4.54 - 4.61 FOP 17 - 18 Junior BOP D Pro
25 4.44 - 4.53 MOPC2 Average Male's Genetic Limit MP Int Pro Tri
26 4.35 - 4.43 Kyle Pounds Australia Top 15Y Junior
27 4.27 - 4.34 BOPC2, Top 14Y Junior
5 Cat 3 - Dedicated 9-5er 28 - 35
28 4.18 - 4.26 FOPC3
29 4.09 - 4.17 BOP Cat 2 Top 18 Year Old
30 4.00 - 4.08 MOP Tri 17 - 65 Ager FOP Local Tri, 9-5ers Realistic Limit BOP Cat 1
31 3.91 - 3.99 Top 13Y Top 17Y
32 3.82 - 3.90 MOPC3 MOP C2 Kyle Pounds College
33 3.73 - 3.81 Kyle's 17Y Racing BOP Expert male Mt Biker TopC3
34 3.64 - 3.72 FOP Cat 4 FOPC3
35 3.55 - 3.63 FOP Cat 3 on Flats MOP Cat4 w/ Hills BOP Cat 2
6 Cat 4 - Part Time 9-5er 36 - 41
36 3.47 - 3.54 FOPC4 FOP Tri Elite
37 3.38 - 3.46 Top 12Y FOP Tri Ager
38 3.29 - 3.37 MOPC4/Sport MOPC3
39 3.20 - 3.28 Top 11Y Top 15Y
40 3.11 - 3.19 FOPC5 FOPC4
41 3.02 - 3.10 Top 10Y Top 14Y
7 Cat 5 - Beginner Racer 42 - 46
42 2.93 - 3.01 BOPC3
43 2.84 - 2.92 BOPC4 Top 13Y
44 2.75 - 2.83 MOPC5 BOPC4
45 2.66 - 2.74 Top 9Y
46 2.58 - 2.65 Top 8Y FOP C5
8 Commuter 47 - 54
47 2.49 - 2.57 Strong Commuter MOPC5
48 2.40 - 2.48 Top Commuter
49 2.31 - 2.39 Kyle's Base @ 40
50 2.22 - 2.30 BOPC5
51 2.13 - 2.21 Average Commuter
52 2.04 - 2.12
53 1.95 - 2.03 Weak Commuter
54 1.86 - 1.94 Weak Commuter
Cyclist Strength Levels in Watts 4/40
1 400s 1 - 10
1 490 - 500 Fabian Cancellara
2 480 - 89
3 470 - 79
4 460 - 69
5 450 - 59
6 440 - 49
7 430 - 39
8 420 - 29
9 410 - 19
10 400 - 9
2 300s 11 - 20
11 390 - 99
12 380 - 89
13 370 - 79
14 360 - 69
15 350 - 59
16 340 - 49
17 330 - 39
18 320 - 29
19 310 - 19
20 300 - 9
3 200s 21 - 30
21 290 - 99
22 280 - 89
23 270 - 79
24 260 - 69
25 250 - 59
26 240 - 49
27 230 - 39
28 220 - 29
29 210 - 29
30 200 - 9
4 100s 32 - 40
31 190 - 99 Kyle's Base @ 40
32 180 - 89 Mike's Base @ 40
33 170 - 79
34 160 - 69
35 150 - 59
36 140 - 49
37 130 - 39
38 120 - 29
39 110 - 19
40 100 - 9
1 Important Strava Segments & Exersizes 148
1 Cyclocross Loops 10
1 Boulder Reservoir CW 0/0 0
2 Boulder Reservoir CCW 0/0 0
3 Dirty Morgul Bismark 0/0 0
4 Figure 8 0/0 0
5 Marshall Mesa CW 0
6 Reservoir & Eagle Trail CW 0/0 0
7 Reservoir & Eagle Trail CCW 0/0 0
8 Steeplechase Loop 0/0 0
9 Valmont Bike Park CX Race Lap 0/0 0
10 Wanker Loop 0/0 0
2 Mountain Biking 22
1 Loops 16
1 Super Hall 0/0 0
2 Betasso CW 0/0 0
3 Betasso CCW 0/0 0
4 Hall Ranch Short Loop CW 0/0 0
5 Betasso CCW Benjamin CW 0/0 0
6 Ponderosa 0/0 0
7 Centenial Park Cone CW 0/0 0
8 Centenial Park Cone CCW 0/0 0
9 Heil to Picture Rock to Hall RT 0/0 0
10 Eagle Wind CW 0/0 0
11 Bald Mountain CCW 0/0 0
12 Crosier Mountain CCW 0/0 0
13 Foosker's Rock CCW 0/0 0
14 Button Rock Big Loop 0/0 0
15 White Ranch Rawhide CW 0 0/0 0
16 White Ranch Rawhide CCW 0 0/0 0
2 Climbs 4
1 Betasso Connector to Trail
2 Sugarloaf Mountain fm Trail
3 4 Mile Drive to Gold Hill Road
4 Betasso CCW Climb to Dirt Road
3 Descents 2
1 Betasso Connector from Trail
2 Valmont Park Corkscrew
3 Road Riding 50
1 Local 7
1 10.1m Lyons to Boulder TT: 0/0 33:09
2 Sunshine 0/0 0
3 Magnolia 0/0 0
4 Sugarloaf 0/0 0
5 Brainard Lake 0/0 0
6 Eldora 0/0 0
2 Mountains 18
1 Alice Top: RT: 0/0 0
2 Apache Top: RT: 0/0 0
3 Evans Top: RT: 0/0 0
4 Fairchild Top: RT: 0/0 0
5 Hagues Top: RT: 0/0 0
6 Hallett Top: RT: 0/0 0
7 James Top: RT: 0/0 0
8 Jasper Top: RT: 0/0 0
9 Isolation Top: RT: 0/0 0
10 Longs Top: RT: 0/0 0
11 Mummy Top: RT: 0/0 0
1 Neva Top: RT: 0/0 0
13 North Arapahoe Top: RT: 0/0 0
14 Ogallala Top: RT: 0/0 0
15 Paiute Top: RT: 0/0 0
16 Sawtooth Top: RT: 0/0 0
17 Sugarloaf Top: RT: 0/0 0
18 Ypsylon Top: RT: 0/0 0
3 Triathlon Courses 4
1 Sprint 20K: 0/0 0
2 Olympic 40K: 0/0 0
3 70.3 90K: 0/0 0
4 Ironman 180.25K: 0/0 0
4 Running 19
1 Foothills
1 Sanitas from Hospital 0/0 0
2 Green from Gregory Canyon 0/0 0
3 Bear from Cragmore TH 0/0 0
4 South Boulder Peak from S Mesa TH 0/0 0
5 Betasso Loop CW 0/0 0
2 Mountains
1 Autobon TH to TH 0/0 0
2 High Lonesome Loop 0/0 0
3 Triathlon Courses
1 Sprint 5K: 0/0 0
2 Olympic 10K: 0/0 0
3 70.3 21.1K: 0/0 0
4 Ironman 42.2K: 0/0 0
 
1 Local Triathlon Riding
1 Sprint 14.71M 23.67K
Strava Link
1/31 35-39 32:49 Steve Johnson
2/31 40-44 33:07 Thomas Woods
3/31 18-24 33:28 Steve Mantell
4/31 Pro 33:43 John Polson
5/31 30-34 34:19 Owen Hammond
6/31 25-29 35:46 Brian Macarthur
7/31 45-49 35:52 Darren De Reuck
8/31 35-39 35:52 Betsy Mercer
9/31 50-54 36:05 Scott Binder
10/31 55-59 36:05 Woody Noleen
11/31 45-49 36:40 Steph Popelar
12/31 Pro 36:44 27.3 Flora Duffy
13/31 40-44 37:27 26.76 Diane Soucheray
14/31 65-69 37:49 Simon Butterworth
15/31 25-29 39:01 Aubrey Cook
16/31 18-24 39:05 Meghan Wiebe
17/31 50-54 39:06 Jane Esahak-Gage
18/31 55-59 38:27 Ellen Hart
19/31 30-34 39:46 Sharon Houghton
20/31 15-17 39:51 Caelan Thom
21/31 60-64 40:13 Michael Orendorff
22/31 60-64 42:35 Lynnda Bests-Wiss
23/31 12-14 44:12 Theodor Cariov
24/31 15-17 44:24 Cassidy Hemp
25/31 65-69 45:54 Diane Ridgway
26/31 70-74 46:06 Michael Chessnoe
27/31 75-79 49:25 Don Whitford
28/31 12-14 50:33 Shannon Derthick
29/31 PC 57:37 John Mc Allaster
30/31 75-79 1:00:27 Judy Smythe
31/31 70-74 1:03:18 Doris Downey
2 Olympic 25.54M 41.1K
Strava Link
1/26 Pro 74.8K 53:19 28.73 Tim O'Donnell
2/26 35-39 55:56 27.4 Steve Johnson
3/26 25-29 56:25 27.17 Davide Giardini
4/26 18-24 57:32 26.63 Steve Mantell
5/26 40-44 57:45 26.53 Joseph Fogarty
6/26 45-49 1:00:20 25.29 Daniel Fernandez
7/26 55-59 1:00:36 25.29 Steve Pyle
8/26 30-34 1:01:24 25.04 Andrew Knutsen
9/26 50-54 1:02:19 24.56 John Poisson
10/26 60-64 1:05:00 23.65 Jon Brown
11/26 65-69 1:05:12 23.43 Charles Perez
12/26 Pro 1:06:02 23.22 Lisa Nordén
13/26 45-49 1:06:22 22.8 Steph Popelar
14/26 30-34 1:06:59 21.83 Hayley Benson
15/26 18-24 1:07:34 22.6 Tess Amer
16/26 25-29 1:09:20 22.02 Sinead Odwyer
17/26 55-59 1:09:37 22.02 Ellen Hart
18/26 35-39 1:10:09 21.83 Karen Melliar-Smith
19/26 40-44 1:11:09 21.46 Karen Franklin
20/26 50-54 1:11:35 21.42 Deborah Croarkin-Svedlow
21/26 60-64 1:14:12 20.6 Judith Laney
22/26 70-74 1:17:36 19.8 Dave Robinette
23/26 15-17 1:19:04 19.35 Gavin Van Horn
24/26 65-69 1:22:19 18.64 Diane Ridgway

25/26 75-79 1:29:32 17.14 Don Whitford

26/26 75-79 1:53:31 13.51 Judy Smythe
3 70.3 Half Ironman 56M 90K
Strava Link

1/23 Pro 2:03:25 27.18 Joe Gambles

2/23 35-39 2:06:32 26.42 Steve Johnson

3/23 Pro 2:12:16 25.45 Melissa Hauschildt

4/23 18-24 2:12:13 25.45 Steve Mantell

5/23 30-34 2:12:43 25.34 Antonio Ferreira Da Silva Neto
6/23 25-29 2:14:45 24.89 John Garita
7/23 45-49 2:14:47 24.89 Mark Ryan
8/23 40-44 2:17:35 24.45 Kyle Fredin
9/23 55-59 2:20:50 23.83 Kevin Edwards
10/23 50-54 2:22:07 23.63 John Noonan

10/23 50-54 2:26:07 22.95 Michelle Blessing

12/23 65-69 2:26:51 22.86 Simon Butterworth

13/23 25-29 2:29:37 22.5 Kaitlin Anelauskas

14/23 40-44 2:29:40 22.5 Rebecca Pedersen

15/23 18-24 2:29:41 22.5 Maruen Solano Acuna

16/23 35-39 2:30:10 22.4 Jennifer Razee

17/23 30-34 2:31:07 22.22 Hayley Benson

18/23 55-59 2:32:04 22.13 Ellen Hart

19/23 60-64 2:37:24 21.37 Jim Fuller

20/23 45-49 2:38:56 21.13 Colleen De Reuck

21/23 60-64 2:50:05 19.79 Lynnda Best-Wiss

22/23 65-69 2:52:10 19.51 Diane Ridgway

23/23 70-74 3:17:33 17.02 Lowell Mutchelknaus
4 Ironman 112M 179.4K
Strava Link
1/21 1/2217 1/298 45-49 4:00:50 Chris Dabbs
2/21 2/2217 1/8 Pro 4:24:47 Richie Cunningham
3/21 4/2217 1/323 40-44 4:25:34 25.3 Michael Breyer
4/21 8/2217 1/293 35-39 4:42:46 23.85 Billy Edwards
5/21 12/2217 1/26 18-24 4:45:37 23.5 Sam Long
6/21 14/2217 1/217 50-54 4:46:40 23.44 Michael Hagen
7/21 22/2217 1/8 Pro 4:52:29 22.95 Carrie Lester
8/21 38/2217 1/101 25-29 5:00:53 Tripp Hipple
9/21 74/2217 1/87 55-59 5:08:07 21.8 Kevin Edwards
10/21 94/2217 1/38 60-64 5:12:09 21.54 Gregory Taylor
11/21 137/2217 1/126 40-44 5:18:59 21.07 Amy Becker
12/21 146/2217 3/88 30-34 5:19:57 21.01 Julie Olsen-Smith
13/21 194/2217 1/32 25-29 5:25:33 20.64 Annie Poland
14/21 212/2217 1/110 45-49 5:26:47 20.58 Diana Hassel
15/21 255/2217 1/115 35-39 5:30:19 20.28 Terry Casey
16/21 261/2217 1/15 65-69 5:30:46 20.26 Simon Butterworth
17/21 372/2217 1/67 50-54 5:38:31 19.85 Cheryl Chaney
18/21 799/2217 1/8 60-64 6:04:12 18.44 Judith Laney
19/21 1114/2217 1/3 65-69 6:21:16 17.61 Diane Ridgway
20/21 1167/2217 1/3 70-74 6:24:25 17.46 Reynold Kalstrom
21/21 1841/2217 1/2 70-74 7:16:31 Joan Lockwood