Bike Racer Levels
Speed/Power Thresholds at Various Times/Distances
scan2237-3
Kickin' it with Bernie
1 100 Bike Racer Levels 1 Hr
1 International Profesional
Levels 1 - 12 / 30 - 33 MPH
2 Domestic Profesional
Levels 13 - 22 / 27.5 - 30 MPH
3 Category 1
Levels 23 - 27 / 26.25 - 27.5 MPH
4 Category 2
Levels 28 - 32 / 25 - 26.25 MPH
5 Category 3
Levels 33 - 40 / 23 - 25 MPH
6 Category 4
Levels 41 - 48 / 21 - 23 MPH
7 Category 5
Levels 49 - 53 / 19.75 - 21 MPH
8 Fast Commuter
Levels 54 - 65 / 16.75 - 19.75 MPH
9 Average Commuter
Levels 66 - 80 / 13 - 16.75 MPH
10 Slow Commuter
Levels 81 - 100 / 8 - 13 MPH

My Bike Racer levels page popped up suddenly around August 2013 when I moved back to Boulder. I was working on my Complete World History Timeline when I moved here, and didn't expect to get distracted by another project, but when I looked out of my bedroom window and saw the Flatirons, I was suddenly filled with what at the time, seemed like an insatiable desire to take advantage of Boulder and get back into riding, take up running and swimming, and do some mountain climbing. Right after I made that decision, though, I was filled with an actual irresistable urge to create a website to make the endurance athlete's lifestyle as interesting as possible by decorating their athletic journey through the Bike Racer Levels with as much data as possible.

I have other charts on my website to help install information like history into our heads, but the best way to learn is by listening to people teach you over the course of a long time, and the best way to have the time to listen is by combining it with endurance sports, because the two activities help each other instead of compete. Academics and athletics working together create Bike School, the new economic and educational model for the world.

Now we can train our mental and physical fitness together complimenting each other as we have dreamed of since the beginning of time. Like what Diogenes the Greek Cynic from Corinth said around 350 B.C.:

The general idea behind my Bike Racer Levels page might seem strange to people who aren't used to the concept of so many categories for something so difficult to pin down. How can you determine with any worthwhile accuracy how fast a category four racer is? In case I spiked your curiosity, the answer is 21 to 23 miles per hour. Or how many watts it takes to go 25 miles per hour? The answer is 240. See how easy it is? Pretty much everybody but me would give up at the thought of quantifying something so nebulous because of all the variables, and leave it to some big budget University study one day, who knows how far in the future. All you have to do is distinguish how the variables change in your chart, but at the same time use a standard so you can give a straight answer. If someone wants to be curious and ask me what I mean by 240 watts to go 25 miles per hour, then I'll tell them that it is with a 150 pound rider on a time trial bike at 5,430 feet at 80 degrees. See how easy that is? I wish everybody thought like that. Let's call it "Scientism thinking". Even the manufacturers of the Watt measureing devices such as Garmin are afraid to make watt charts for their machines, but I tell you that just because things take a long time and require a lot of executive thinking to categorize because their definitions overlap, doesn't mean it's not possible and not worth it. All you need to do to make it possible to, "quantify the non quantifyable", is to keep the samples at a reasonably small number and give a reason for why your examples are representative of the whole. Don't forget that not everything has to be a huge multi-person project to be worth it; because if you want to see something and you have a feeling that nobody else will do it for you, then you won't have anybody around to be better than you, and if somebody else makes a chart that is better than yours, you can still bask in the glory of being the first and enjoy the thought of yourself playing a part in the development of a new field of study. There is no losing by creating something original. I feel like we should coin a new word, like "Scientism," to describe the act of taking a reasonable amount of data that one person can collect, and turning it into a clear piece of informational artwork without the fear of ridicule as some kind of half assed scientist. The fact of the matter is that if you show your data, and it is from a small enough of a sample set to not devour people's time, than people who see your charts and data have just as much data as you as the creator does; that way people know exactly how you determined the parameters and nobody has to wonder how honest you are because all of the data is right there for everybody to look at together. You shouldn't have to think of yourself as a perfectionist to be a scientist. The data just has to make a pattern that makes sense to the person who made it, and maybe one other person in the whole wide world, and it's worth it. Besides, by building my Watt Chart I found out that science can be a lot less exact than people who aren't experienced with the scientific process probably expect. My Watt Pedals were giving me such inconsistent information that I had to perform the pedaling experiments multiple times before I could form a pattern that made sense to me. It helped me understand how scientists can argue so much about stuff that is supposed to be so straighforward. If you are not entirely honest and cherry pick your data, than you can make it say whatever you want as long as you do the experiments enough times, because there seems to always be variation in the measurements under the same circumstances because the measuring devices aren't perfect all the time.

It is good to track exactly where you are in the pack in all of the distances compared to everybody else because it keeps you interested in riding. When people post photos of themselves doing fun things on instragram, it makes them want to do more fun things and it inspires others to do the same. People sharing their athletic numbers, like with Strava, has the same effect. Our demand for intelligence will continuously increase until we have color coded lights, accronyms and symbols flashing all over the place to keep us up to date on what is going on as our brains develop more and more curiosity.

My Bike Racer Levels page has 100 different speed levels over 12 time/distance categories, as well as a category for climbing and one for the combined levels of climbing, flats and descending, which makes a total of 14 Bike Racer Level categories.

The speed categories are displayed by results in real time trials, triathlons and strava rides that correspond to their respective distance categories. The rider is attached to a speed category by what their average speed is in a race of a distance that is within the range of it's level. With this method, you can compare riders from different time trials as if they were in the same time trial. You just need to make sure that the course you are using is flat and fast so everybody in the list is at relatively the same advantage. I list what race they are in and what division they are so the levels of the divisions can be determined with my Category Level Chart. Some other charts I have are a passing speed chart that is a cross chart that shows how fast people of each category pass each other, the pulling and drafting chart, which shows the percentage of drafting and pulling various levels of riders would do when they ride with each other in groups of two, the fade chart which shows the levels of each distance for a particular rider, the rider type chart which shows the weight range of riders showing the advantages and disadvantages of the heavy vs light riders, the weight carry chart which shows how much of the slower person's weight the faster person would have to carry in order to be at the same speed, and the fluid trainer speed chart which shows how fast someone is going in real life on a triathlon bike according to how fast someone is going on a Fluid Trainer.

In order to make the bike riding experience even more interesting, I have created a map to show 100 speed levels of eight distances and Riding Times so that people can guage their progress and decline throughout their life long bike racing carreers. The Bike Racer Levels page doesn't just increase interest in cycling, it also helps people become better cyclists. If you know how good all of the riders are, then it is easier to put appropriate teams together for big rides and races. It also helps people determine how talented they are because it displays how good various types of cyclists are with specific names attached to each level that people can research and find out the talent range because you will read of someone who did very well after a short time training or another person on the other side of the spectrum who trains all the time for years and can only reach a certain level. The levels page is supposed to help the non talented as well as the talented. It helps the talented because it incourages people. It helps the non talented because it shows them how much they need to ride in order to get to a level they want to get to, and to be realistic. When you know how good you are not, it is easier on your ego to be as bad as you are because you know you are not alone.

Different people are talented at different distances and it is interesting to study why and how different people in the pack perform differently between the different distances. Sometimes a person's riding talent is a result of their genetics and sometimes it is a result of their training.

How the Bike Racer Levels Page works

The Bike Racer Levels Pages are to standartize all of the time trials and divisions to create a clear representation where everybody is in the pack. Because people's speeds change throughout the ride, there are 10 Time/Distance Categories, but the base level by which we simply define a racer's level is the One Hour/40Kilometer/25Mile one because it represents a typical ride. The 20 Minute one is almost as important because it represents a typical commute as well as the typical distance of a time trial for juniors and women. When people talk about someone's FTP it seems like about half the time they are talking about the 20 minute one. People are not good at distinguishing which one they are talking about so you have to guess which one it is based on who they are and what is realistic.

Riding Conditions

The level of a persons road riding is divided into eleven Riding Conditions, which include nine Time/Distance and three climbing levels, with the benchmark being the one hour represented by 40 Kilometer Time Trial. I like making the times and distances of the different racing time levels increase in a symetrical way in order to keep it simple, even though riders decrease speed as miles increase which more than doubles time.

Kreuzotter Calculor

I don't know how they did it, but the Germans have created the Kreuzotter page, which scienfically calculates a riders level by entering every important variable within reason pertaining to the bicycle and the rider. With this tool all you need is someone's Flat Time Trial time and the kind of bike they used then you know what rider level they are on the flats. If you know their bodyweight then all you have to do is enter 8.11% to the climb field and you know their L'alpe D'huez climbing speed and then can calculate your time on my Climbing Level page or Climbing Time trial page.

Determining my Bike Racer Levels throughout my Bike Racing Career

I never timed myself or went to any Time Trials as a kid. I was more of an adventure Mountain Biker. I guess I was around mid pack. I raced the Red Zinger Mini Classic stage race around Boulder four times from 1984-87 and then was strictly a Mountain Biker. I was 16th in '84, 8th in '85, 18th in '86 and 25th in '87. Even though I could have done it two more years I quit racing the Red Zinger after I was 13 because I developed a knee disease called Osgood–Schlatter and was told to stop riding hard. I was also told to quit running and Nordic Ski Racing. I was on the 7th grade track team and didn't run again until 12th grade cross country. I don't think it was necesary for my knee to quit Ski racing but I didn't mind it because my brother did it too and I knew how expensive it was for my parents. I went to physical therapy a couple times a week one year when I was like doing ultra sound on the sore lump under my knee. I like to believe that because I took those precautions I will have healthy knees for when I start riding my bike again.

I was a Mountain Bike racer until through the 1991 summer when I was 17. I didn't do any group rides during that time so it's hard to guess what level I was. I did four Licensed Junior races in '90 or '91 I can't remember which, and I think I got last or second to last place in all of them, I think because I didn't have leg speed because they started off really fast and it was over for me immediately. On a good day I was a pretty good mountain biker though so for this chart I will classify myself growing up as the average for a boy of my age. I have a thin build so maybe a little above average on the climbs and a little below average on the flats to keep it simple.

The first time I timed myself on anything was in 2008 when I did the Lyons to Boulder Time Trial, but I wasn't in riding shape. I was only riding about once every couple weeks and I couldn't feel my legs which is a guage on whether or not i'm in "riding shape". My time was 33:09 I think which was dead last for the men and I think I beat like three or women. I think that put me around the top of fast commuter where you would expect me to be having not been regularly training.

The 25 Mile Per Hour speed range consists of 10 categories that increase in speed from 8 to 33 miles per hour in increments of 5, 3.75, 3, 1.25, 2, 2, 1.25, 1.25, 2.5, and 3. Three miles per hour is the maximum difference in speed that riders can have and be riding partners because drafting reduces 30% of watts needed to maintain a certain speed which is how much less watts you would need to reduce your speed by three miles per hour, so if a 27 mph rider is on a ride with a 24 mph.

10 Bike Racer Categories
1 Hour / 40K
1 I Pro 30 - 33 45:35 - 49:35
2 D Pro 29 - 30 49:35 - 51:35
3 C1 28 - 29 51:35 - 53:15
4 C2 27 - 28 53:15 - 55:10
5 C3 25 - 27 55:10 - 59:40
6 C4 22.5 - 25 59:40 - 1:06:15
7 C5 20 - 22.5 1:06:15 - 1:14:30
8 FC 17.5 - 20 1:14:30 - 1:25
9 AC 15 - 17.5 1:25 - 1:41
10 SC 10 - 15 1:41 - 3:48
2 Time Trial Pages 10
1 Sprint/10-30"
200-500M/656-1,640ft
Strava Sprint 500 Meter Ride
2 Attack 30"-1'
500M-2K/
1,640ft-1.24M
Strava 2K Pursuit Ride
3 Pursuit 2:30-5'
2-5K/1.24-3.2M
3K
Strava Pursuit 5K Ride
4K
Strava Pursuit 5K Ride
4 Commute 10-20'
5-20K 3.2-12.5M
Strava 20K Ride
5 Small 20-45'
20-30K/12.5-25M
Strava 20K Ride
MTB
6 Normal 45'-2:00
40-60K/25-37M
Strava Normal Ride 40K
7 Big 2-4Hs
60-90K 37-56M
Strava Endurance Ride 180 Kilometers
8 Endurance 4-9Hs
90-180K
56-112
9 Super Endurance 9-18Hs
180-360K 112-225
10 Ultra Endurance 18-30Hs
360-720K 225-450
strava Super Endurance Boulder 360K
11 Rally Week 720-2,500K
450-1,550
strava Super Endurance Boulder 360K
12 Tour Month 2,500-5,000K
1,550-3,100
strava Super Endurance Boulder 360K
13 Lifestyle Year
4,000-125,000K 3,100-78,000
strava Super Endurance Boulder 360K
scan0171-1
In the 80's I was Junior Member of the
Red Zinger Bike Team
100 Bike Racer Levels
1 International Pro 12 30 - 33 3
1/1 32.75 - 33
2/2 32.5 - 32.75
3/3 32.25 - 32.5
4/4 32 - 32.25
5/5 31.75 - 32
6/6 31.5 - 31.75
7/7 31.25 - 31.5
8/8 31 - 31.25
9/9 30.75 - 31
10/10 30.5 - 30.75
11/11 30.25 - 30.5
12/12 30 - 30.25
2 Domestic Pro 10 27.5 - 30 2.5
13/1 29.75 - 30
14/2 29.5 - 29.75
15/3 29.25 - 29.5
16/4 29 - 29.25
17/5 28.75 - 29
18/6 28.5 - 28.75
19/7 28.25 - 28.5
20/8 28 - 28.25
2 Domestic Pro 10 27.5 - 30 2.5
21/9 27.75 - 28
22/10 27.5 - 27.75
3 Cat 1 5 26.25 - 27.5 1.25
23/1 27.25 - 27.5
24/2 27 - 27.25
25/3 26.75 - 27
26/4 26.5 - 26.75
27/5 26.25 - 26.5
4 Cat 2 5 25 - 26.25 1.25
28/1 26 - 26.25
29/2 25.75 - 26
30/3 25.5 - 25.75
31/4 25.25 - 25.5
32/5 25 - 25.25
5 Cat 3 8 23 - 25 2
33/1 24.75 - 25
34/2 24.5 - 24.75
35/3 24.25 - 24.5
36/4 24 - 24.25
37/5 23.75 - 24
38/6 23.5 - 23.75
39/7 23.25 - 23.5
40/8 23 - 23.25
6 Cat 4 8 21 - 23 2
41/1 22.75 - 23
42/2 22.5 - 22.75
43/3 22.25 - 22.5
44/4 22 - 22.25
45/5 21.75 - 22
46/6 21.5 - 21.75
47/7 21.25 - 21.5
48/8 21 - 21.25
7 Cat 5 5 19.75 - 21 1.25
49/1 20.75 - 21
50/2 20.5 - 20.75
51/3 20.25 - 20.5
52/4 20 - 20.5
53/5 19.75 - 20
8 Fast Commuter 14
18 - 19.75 1.75
54/1 19.5 - 19.75
55/2 19.25 - 19.5
56/3 19 - 19.25
57/4 18.75 - 19
58/5 18.5 - 18.75
59/6 18.25 - 18.5
60/7 18 - 18.25
8 Fast Commuter 14 18 - 19.75 1.75
54/8 19.5 - 19.75
55/9 19.25 - 19.5
56/10 19 - 19.25
57/11 18.75 - 19
58/12 18.5 - 18.75
59/13 18.25 - 18.5
60/14 18 - 18.25
9 Averave Commuter 5
16.75 - 18 1.25
61/1 17.75 - 18
62/2 17.5 - 17.75
63/3 17.25 - 17.5
64/4 17 - 17.25
65/5 16.75 - 17
10 Slow Commuter 35
8 - 16.75 8.75
66/1 16.5 - 16.75
67/2 16.25 - 16.5
68/3 16 - 16.25
69/4 15.75 - 16
70/5 15.5 - 15.75
71/6 15.25 - 15.5
72/7 15 - 15.25
73/8 14.75 - 15
74/9 14.5 - 14.74
75/10 14.25 - 14.5
76/11 14 - 14.25
77/12 13.75 - 14
78/13 13.5 - 13.75
79/14 13.25 - 13.5
80/15 13 - 13.25
10 Slow Commuter 35
8 - 16.75 8.75
81/16 12.75 - 13
82/17 12.5 - 12.75
83/18 12.25 - 12.5
84/19 12 - 12.25
85/20 11.75 - 12
86/21 11.5 - 11.75
87/22 11.25 - 11.5
88/23 11 - 11.25
89/24 10.75 - 11
90/25 10.5 - 10.75
91/26 10.25 - 10.5
92/27 10 - 10.25
93/28 9.75 - 10
94/29 9.5 - 9.75
95/30 9.25 - 9.5
96/31 9 - 9.25
97/32 8.75 - 9
98/33 8.5 - 8.75
99/34 8.25 - 8.5
100/35 8 - 8.25
1 10 Bike Racer Categories
10 Cyclists Categories
1 Hour / 40K
1 I Pro 30 - 33 45:35 - 49:35
2 D Pro 29 - 30 49:35 - 51:35
3 C1 28 - 29 51:35 - 53:15
4 C2 27 - 28 53:15 - 55:10
5 C3 25 - 27 55:10 - 59:40
6 C4 22.5 - 25 59:40 - 1:06:15
7 C5 20 - 22.5 1:06:15 - 1:14:30
8 FC 17.5 - 20 1:14:30 - 1:25
9 AC 15 - 17.5 1:25 - 1:41
10 SC 10 - 15 1:41 -3:48


g

1 Rider Division Chart
Age & Sex
Male Racer Category
Local

National

International
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 9 - 10
16
14
18
16
20
18
1 Slow Commuter 5
8
10.5
13
2 11 - 12 4
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 11 - 12
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 11 - 12
18
15
20
19
23
21
2 Average Commuter 3.75
13
14.9
16.75
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 13 - 14
19
17
22
19.5
25
22
3 Fast Commuter 3
16.75
18.25
19.75
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 15 - 16
22
19
24
21
26
23
4 Category 5 1.25
19.75
20.4
21
5 17 - 18 4
23
20
25
22
27
24
5 17 - 18 4
25
22
27
24
29
26
5 17 - 18 3
27
24
28.5
25.5
30
27
5 Category 4 2
21
22
23
6 Pro 3
26.25
24
28.5
25.5
27.5
25
6 Pro
27.5
24
28.75
25.5
30
28
6 Pro
30
25
31.5
27
33
29
6 Category 3 2
23
24
25
7 35 - 39
7 35 - 39
7 35 - 39
7 Category 2 1.25
25
25.6
26.25
8 40 - 44
28
8 40 - 44
8 40 - 44
8 Category 1 1.25
26.25
26.9
27.5
9 45 - 49
27
9 45 - 49
9 45 - 49
9 Domestic Professional Racer 2.5
27.5
24
28.75
25.5
30
27
10 50 - 54
10 50 - 54
10 50 - 54
10 International Professional Racer 3
30
25
31.5
27
33
29
11 55 - 59
11 55 - 59
11 55 - 59
12 60 - 64
12 60 - 64
12 60 - 64
13 65 - 69
13 65 - 69
13 65 - 69
14 70 - 74
14 70 - 74
14 70 - 74
15 75 - 79
15 75 - 79
15 75 - 79
16 80 - 84
12
16 80 - 84
13
16 80 - 84
14
2 12 Race Distances


The 12 Time/Distance categories are:

1 Sprinting for 5 seconds, Power 9 - 30 Seconds

2 Aenarobic Power which takes one minute for the average rider to go a Kilometer, 30 Seconds - 2 Minutes

3 Functional Aenarobic Power for five minutes in track races of three to four Kilometers 5-6 Minutes, 3-4 Kilometers

4 Aerobic for 20 Minutes represented by races that are 8 to 20 Kilometers on my list. 20 - 30 Minutes, 18-30 Kilometers

5 Functional Aerobic Threshold Power; otherwise known as FTP. 1H/40K (45 Minutes - 2 Hours, 35-60 Kilometers)
24.85M/40K

6 Glyco-Lipolitic Distance which are 90K Half Marathon Bike Splits and take around three hours. It's called Glyco because after an hour and a half the glycogen (sugar) leaves your muscles and you have to slow down and have to wait for more glycogen from your stomach. 90K/2.5 Hrs 2 - 3 Hours

7 Endurance represented by 180 Kilometer Ironman Races that usually take six hours. 8) Ultra Endurance which is represented as double Endurance in time and distance, and then 9) Adventure which is doubles the distance and time again up to 24 hours and 720 Kilometers, which is 447 Miles. 180K/4 -6 Hours

8 Ultra Endurance
8-12 Hours
360

Climbing Level

While fast flat non drafting time trials are the only way to standardize rider levels, they don't represent the real world because of the hills and mountains, so I made a standardized climbing level as a way to illustrate how peoples place on the levels changes between flats and climbs based on bodyweight. The course that I fixed the climbing level to is the one with the most extensive results, L'alpe D'huez of Tour de France fame. L'alpe D'huez is also perfect as a standardized climbing course because it matches perfectly with the Hour FTP because it takes the average racer about an hour to ride up. People in Boulder are fortunate to have a twin sister course to the L'alpe D'huez in the Sunshine Canyon Hillclimb race. From comparing the times of the racers and considering their rider levels I have determined that the L'alpe D'huez climb from the first switchback to the Tour de France finish line takes the exact same time to complete as the Sunshine Canyon race course. The profiles of the two courses are very similar as you can see in the chart to the right. To compare the times on the two courses look at the Climbing page. For people who don't live near L'alpe D'huez or Boulder, climbing speed up the L'alpe D'huez can be calculated by entering the L'alpe D'huez grade (8.11%) and bodyweight to the riders Kreuzotter Calculator Hour speed.

Combination Levels

There are two ways I combine climbing and flat terrain. One is the combined time between the 40 Kilometer Time Trial (or adjusted time in a similar distance TT) and your L'alpe D'huez time, and the other is the time of your 2013 L'alpe D'huez Tour de France stage by plugging your hour ftp speed into the flat sections and your climbing speed into the climbing sections. If you wanted to make it more sophisticated you could plug in your endurance speed into the L'alpe D'huez stage and your hour speed into the climbing & Hour combination stage. In the real world because we don't know people's comparative endurance, the two combination Levels are just two ways to illustrate someone's overall riding, with the first being 50% flats and 50% climbing and the second being more realistic ?% flats and ?% climbing.

12 Race Distances
2 Aenarobic Speed 500 - 1K 1 - 5M
3 Functional Aenarobic 3 - 4 5 - 20M
4 Aerobic 20 20 - 45M
5 Functional Aerobic 40 45 - 60M
6 Glyco-Lipolitic 90 2 - 4H
7 Endurance 180 4 - 7H
8 Ultra Endurance 360 7 - 12H
9 Adventure 720 12 - 24 H / .5 - 1D
10 Trip1,440 1 - 2D
11 Tour 2,880 2 - 7D
12 Expedition 5,760 7 - 30D
4 Time Trial Pages

 

 

 
5 Charts

It is entertaining and educational to look at visual representations of the various riding speeds with the help of Google Earth. By illustrating where all the different types of riders would be in relation to each other and the landscape, you can visualize where you would be within the greater pack at your current, past and projected racer levels.

These levels are determined by Time Trial and Triathlon Bike Split results on flat courses of all of the Bike Racer Categories in all of the different levels and distances in all three competition levels: 1 Local, 2 National and 3 International. You can read all about my Bike Racer Levels on my Bike Racer Levels page. With Google Earth I have created three visual aids to help illustrate what my 100 bike racer levels are: 1 Radiating Circles, 2 Haystack Time Trial, and 3 the Pack of 200.

1 Radiating Circles & Racers - I have Circles and Racers that represent my 100 Bike Racer Levels by radiating out from Haystack Mountain to distance determined by how far Racers can go in one hour.

I made the Radiating Circles & Racers collection so I could use Google Earth to aid in my study of the area where I live along with where I am within the greater pack of all the racers. I can trace my progress as I gain more ground and pass other riders. I can imagine myself making it farther in one hour in variety of interesting circumstances, such as an imaginary bike race with various riders along multi lane time trial race course who start at the same time and this section would be like taking snapshot of where they would be after their hour time trial, or an imaginary volcano at haystack mountain that spews toxic vapor that radiates out and affects people to various degrees depenting on how far away they made it due to their escape velocities. Because at the time Haystack Mountain was Temple / Building residence like the pyramid hotel in las vegas only the citizens of Santamonium didn't know that it was dormant volcano. They just thought the toxic vapor that came out and made them high was going to be like that forever. But then it just got too much one day and they all had to break out and so the strongest riders had the best chance of survival. The Radiating Circles is visually interesting because the area of the circle that is created by the radius of the rider is of comparable size to historical tribal and kingdom areas. For example, the typical 40 Kilometer diameter tribal territory circumference aligns very closely with the strongest rider of the slow commuter category, and the fastest racer's circle is third of the way between the 80 and 160 Kilometer Diameter Circles, which is around the size of the Roman Republic. When you superimpose everything together with Google Earth you can visualize the relationship between it all in your head in an intricate way that can improve your interest in riding, geography, history, your imagination and all kinds of things. For example, you could be at the middle of level 43 which is the beginning of farmer's field, and you know of someone who is two levels ahead of you at the end of the farmer's field half mile away, so you could imagine your quest to make it accross the farmer's field by improving your 40 kilometer time trial by minute and half which translates into half mile of distance over an hour.

The Radiating Circles on Google Earth illuminates the reality of the bike racer levels in six ways: 1 Racer Categories, 2 Racer Levels, 3 Racer Pins 4 Racer Bodies, 5 Racer Drafter Categories and 6 Racer Puller Categories.

          1 Racer Category Overlays - The 10 Racer Categories have 20% opacity color coded overlays to give land territory to the various bike racer categories. The Racer Category territories range in thickness from 1.25 miles as with the five level categories one and two to the 20 category five mile wide slow commuter territory. These circles make nice looking rainbow from map of the USA.

          2 Racer Level Lines - There are 100 color coded circles that represent how far the fastest rider in each category can ride in one hour. The lines are separated by quarter of mile, which is the distance around the common high school track. This makes it easier to visualize how far away they are when they are consistent with such common feature of the natural landscape as the quarter mile track. It is also consistent with the common farmer's circle which is half mile in diameter, so if you want to catch someone who is one level faster than you it means that you need to make it halfway accross the farmer's field on your favourite local 40 Km or 25 mile time trial course, or to be more accurate, how far you can go in one hour, and take your average speed to determine your level and where you are on the map. When you have location on the map than you can attach physical location to your bike racer level, and you are part of community of time trialists frozen in time as you race through the landscape. You can visualize certain faster people at specific locations to the East and slower people at their places to the West, and view the pathway as metric of how good of bike racer you are.

          3 Racer Pins - an imaginary racetrack that starts at the top of Haystack Mountain and heads West. Maybe one day we will actually have multi lane bike race track that goes from Haystack all the way to the Atlantic Ocean so people can race the ultra long distances in the most luxurious way possible. The pins are put to good use in helping to locate where the line of racing and racers are. You can also use the pins to identify what level you are looking at by clicking on the pin and it shows on the list to the left of Google Earth which level it is.

          4 Racer Bodies & Bikes - 2,089 individual racers are shown in their accurate size as they appear headed east along the imaginary racetrack. There are twelve racers to level, and every level is quarter mile, so the racers are separated by 33.33 meters, which is almost identical to the 33.36 meters between the posts of the walls of historic city. It is also very similar to how far apart racers are in non drafting triathlons, so it looks just like real race.

          5 Racer Drafter's Lines - There are color coded lines next to the riders that show what category of drafter riders behind you are. By knowing the category drafter you know how much percentage they will draft and how slow of riders you can ride with at your 100% one hour riding pace without getting dropped by you.

          6 Racer Pullers Lines - There are color coded lines next to the riders that show which levels of riders faster than you have in relation to you in terms of how much percentage of the time they will pull you and how fast of rider you can ride with where they are going hour pace and you won't get dropped by them.

2 Haystack Time Trial - 0

1 Bikes -

2 Levels -

3 Level Ranges -

4 Riders -

3 Pack of 200 -

5 Area Circles

I have 23 different circle sizes based on diameter ranging from one meter (one person) to 10,340 kilometers (The world). They are designed to familiarize us with the geography of their respective areas, so we can relate the large and the small as well as places of similar size in different locations. For example, if you have the blue circle of the typical 40 kilometer accross tribal area over Boulder County, then it is easier to relate how far apart things are in Rome if you have the same sized circle there because you know how boulder looks at the same dimension. The circles radiate from 43 locations on the globe which represent all of the different landscapes and together with their largest circles cover the entire planet. Within each circle there are color coded tracings of example trips that represent all of the racing distances on self powered vehicles on all terrains. For example, on the 500 Meter circle in the middle of the ocean, there is 50 meter long blue line that represents the 50 meter swimming race, on the 500 Meter circle in Boulder there is 100 Meter red line on the sidewalk that represents 100 meter running race and on the One Kilometer circle there is 500 Meter white line on the road that represents track bike sprint of that distance.

Sizes of Things

If you want to know how big things are and how big they are compared to each other, you came to the right place. My Sizes of things page has 45 size dimensions ranging from the electron to the known universe, with us remarkably close to the middle. The sizes are shown on the top of each size dimension section with the width of the white backWe live in size dimension number 19 so we are 58% closer in size to the Electron than the Universe to be exact. Out of the 45

With us as the anchor dimension at one meter accross the yellow background field, there are 18 smaller dimensions and 29 larger dimensions.

Fade %
1M
28
5M
99%
20M
98%
1Hr
97%
3Hr
95%
6Hr
80%
12Hr
60%
24Hr
50%
Level Speeds for the Various Distances
Category
1 I Pro
2 D Pro
3 C1
4 C2
5 C3
6 C4
7 C5
8 FC
9 AC
10 SC
1 F200M
35.75-40
35.75-34.75
34.75-33.75
33.75-33
33-31.75
31.75-30.75
30.75-29.5
29.5-28.25
28.25-22
N/A-N/A
37.5-32.5
32.5-31.5
31.5-31.5
31.5-29.75
29.75-28.5
28.5-26.5
26.5-25
25-23.75
23.75-22
N/A-N/A
35.25-29
29-28
28-27
27-25.5
25.5-24.5
24.5-23.25
23.25-21.5
21.5-19.75
19.75-15
15-11.25
33-28.5
28.5-27.5
27.5-26.5
26.5-24.5
24.5-24
24-21
21-19.75
19.75-16.75
16.75-15
15-11.25
28.5-27.5
27.5-26.5
26.5-24.5
24.5-24
24-21
21-19.75
19.75-16.75
16.75 -15
15-11.25
11.25-
27.5-28
25.75-27.5
24.5-25.75
23-24.5
21.5-19.75
19.75-17
8 360K
9 720K
10 1,440
11 2,880
12 5,760
1 Level Chart for Kyle Pounds
Me at what
Age
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
College
T Eur 97
T Aus 99
TSAm 01
TE10 & Mo
1 9-30S
250M
2 30S-2M
500M-1K
3 5-6M
2-4K
4 20-30M
18-30K
5 45M-2H
35-60K
6 2-3H
90K
7 4-6
180K
8 8-12H
360K
9 16-24
720K
10 24H-1W
1,440K